Star Magnolia

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Star Magnolia bush ThumbnailNative to Japan, the Star Magnolia (Magnolia stellata) is a small deciduous tree, or sometimes considered a large shrub. The Star Magnolia can be found growing in areas of Japan's largest island, Honshu. It grows in moist areas, such as stream beds, at elevations between 50 metres and 600 metres. It has been brought to North America and now grows naturally there as well.

The Star Magnolia is very slow growing, but very large, reaching heights up to 20 feet tall and when mature, it will be about 15 feet wide at the top. When young, the Star Magnolia has an oval shape to the foliage, upright of course, and turns into more of a mound shape as it matures.

Star Magnolia Flowers

The Star Magnolia has large white or light pink star-shaped flowers that bloom early in the growth cycle. Pink colored magnolia flowers tend to change the hue of their coloration from year to year depending on the temperature around the flowering stage. The flowers will appear in the spring before the leaves grow. Star Magnolia flowers are about 3 to 4 inches wide, each with 12 thin tepals, and are slightly fragrant.

Star Magnolia Leaves

The leaves of the Star Magnolia have an oblong shape, growing to 10 cm long and 4 cm wide. They are greenish-bronze colored when young, but when they mature, the leaves turn a dark green. In the fall they turn a yellow color before falling off the tree.

Star Magnolia Fruit

The fruit of the Star Magnolia tree grows about 2 inches long, and is a greenish-red in color. The fruit opens in the early autumn season. The seeds inside are reddish-orange, and are revealed by slits when the fruit opens. Often the fruit will drop from the Star Magnolia before being fully developed.

Other Star Magnolia Information

The bark on the trunk of the Star Magnolia is a grayish-silver color, while growing branches appear to have a chestnut brown color, and are shiny and smooth. The Star Magnolia roots do not like being disturbed, and they grow pretty close to the ground.

 
 

 

 
     
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